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Improvement Salt Tolerance of Safflower Plants by Endophytic Bacteria

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Abstract:

Salinity is one of the most dangerous environmental limiting factors of the plant productivity. A wide range of adaptation strategies is required to overcome salinity stress. However, such strategies seem to be long drawn and cost-intensive. It has been confirmed in recent years that plant growth promoting endophytes (PGPEs) that have the ability to further build a symbiotic association with their host to improve host plant salt tolerance. In our investigation try to improve plant salt tolerance using different species of endophytic bacteria. From the total eight endophytic bacterial species were isolated from root, stem, and leaf of Carthamus tinctorius (safflower) plant, two isolates were capable of using 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) as a sole nitrogen source, and they are of positive results for (ACC) deaminase activity and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) production. The bacterial isolates were identified using 16S ribosomal DNA technique as Bacillus cereus and Bacillus aerius and had accession numbers MG708176 and MG711593 respectively, by submitting their sequences in GenBank database. This study showed that the bacterial strains B. cereus and B. aerius are valuable biological plant growth promoters that could enhance salt tolerance in Safflower plants under 100, 200, and 300mMNaCl levels resulting in an increase in plant growth and ascorbate-glutathione redox cycle, in comparison with the non-inoculated controls. Our findings reported that the co-inoculation of the two selected endophytic bacteria strains were successfully isolated from Safflower seedlings significantly alleviated the harmful effects of salt stress, promoted plant growth and biomass yield.

Info:

Periodical:
Journal of Horticulture and Plant Research (Volume 5)
Pages:
38-56
Citation:
K. A. Hemida and A. M.M. Reyad, "Improvement Salt Tolerance of Safflower Plants by Endophytic Bacteria", Journal of Horticulture and Plant Research, Vol. 5, pp. 38-56, 2019
Online since:
January 2019
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