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An Ecocritical Reading of Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd

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Abstract:

This article aims to analyze Thomas Hardy’s novel, Far from the Madding Crowd, from the perspective of ecocriticism and study where Hardy’s ecological consciousness originates from and how it is represented and interwoven in the characters, setting and plot of the novel. It also focuses on such questions as how Gabriel Oak can be the voice of harmony in nature and what does the portrayal of this character tell us about today’s ecological crises? Ecocriticism, a newly found theoretical framework, explores the ways in which how environment is illustrated in literature and, by so doing, examines and proposes possible solutions concerning our contemporary environmental situation. In an era where a long-established rustic order are giving way to the giants of technology and industrial capitalism, there remains no more appealing vision than that of England’s pastoral and green land. In his Wessex, a part real and a part dream country which is the setting for most of his works, Hardy vividly and skillfully describes his vision and longs for the rustic nature of England. He lays stress to the intrinsic values of nature where men establish a harmonious relationship with their environments.

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Periodical:
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (Volume 73)
Pages:
62-69
Citation:
H. Heidari "An Ecocritical Reading of Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd", International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, Vol. 73, pp. 62-69, 2016
Online since:
Sep 2016
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