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The Burnout Level of Call Center Agents in Metro Manila, Philippines

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Abstract:

The aim of this study was to measure the exhaustion, cynicism and professional efficacy that would determine an individual’s level of burnout. A convenient sample of employees (N=747) was obtained from different call centers in Metro Manila. The results indicated a high level of exhaustion for the age group of 18-29 years old and for the female respondents. More than half of the respondents were high in cynicism and those who reported a low professional efficacy were mostly females. Age showed a significant relationship with exhaustion and cynicism while tenure at present job showed a significant relationship with professional efficacy. Results implied that working in a call center may lead to employee burnout especially for females and those who are new in their job.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (Volume 70)
Pages:
21-29
Citation:
A. F. Montalbo "The Burnout Level of Call Center Agents in Metro Manila, Philippines", International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, Vol. 70, pp. 21-29, 2016
Online since:
Jun 2016
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References:

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