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International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences
Volume 66

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Multiple Perspectives Toward Women in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness: A Feministic Overview

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Abstract:

Undoubtedly, in spite of all those efforts done during the years, the mentality towards the superiority of male over female is still being reflected in the works of art written by men. Joseph Conrad, the Polish author, who wrote great masterpieces in English, is not an exception. His great work of art, Heart of Darkness, reflects multiple perspectives towards women. By applying a Feminist approach towards this novel, this article tends to present an analytical overview of the mentality of men towards women in the written work of art, Heart of Darkness.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (Volume 66)
Pages:
129-134
Citation:
F. Fakhimi Anbaran "Multiple Perspectives Toward Women in Joseph Conrad’s Heart of Darkness: A Feministic Overview", International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, Vol. 66, pp. 129-134, 2016
Online since:
February 2016
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References:

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