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International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences
Volume 57
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Ruth and De-Valuation of the Values of Victorian Period

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Abstract:

The novel Ruth by Elizabeth Gaskell is a novel which deconstructs the values of the Victorian society. In fact this novel devalues the values of this period by bucking the system of Victorian norms and values. This is manifested in the change of Ruth from a naïve to mature girl through her fall. In fact her fall makes her wise. When she dies she is given a funeral which is given to a virtuous woman. Her funeral is a slap on the face of the Victorian ideals of goodness and badness. This tells us that the values should be revised when such a person is not that much bad while she is considered bad. Gaskell devalues the values of Victorian society through her heroine’s migration and her living under a false name to teach us a lesson as to how shaky the Victorian ideas are and should be checked again. In fact, this novel has contributed, though little, to the way a woman like Ruth should be viewed.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (Volume 57)
Pages:
160-165
Citation:
S. Moqari and N. Elahipanah, "Ruth and De-Valuation of the Values of Victorian Period", International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, Vol. 57, pp. 160-165, 2015
Online since:
August 2015
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References:

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