Paper Titles in Periodical
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences
Volume 52
Subscribe

Subscribe to our Newsletter and get informed about new publication regulary and special discounts for subscribers!

ILSHS > Volume 52 > Investigation of the Degree of Perceived Face...
< Back to Volume

Investigation of the Degree of Perceived Face Threat in Low, Medium, and High Face Threat Situations Regarding Politeness Theory in Iranian EFL Contexts

Full Text PDF

Abstract:

The goal of this study was to investigate the degree of perceived face threat in three different situations namely low, medium, and high face threat situations with respect to politeness theory in Iranian EFL Contexts. To obtain this purpose, 140 undergraduate students including 70 males and 70 females majoring in English literature, translation and teaching from Sheik-Bahai University were selected. This sample was chosen by means of stratified random sampling procedure. A questionnaire was utilized as the instrument to examine the degree of perceived face threat in three aforementioned situations. The data gathered by means of the questionnaire were analyzed to find out the answer to the research question. In general, the findings revealed that there was a statistically significant difference among students’ performance in perceived face threat scenarios.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (Volume 52)
Pages:
28-32
Citation:
A. Faridizad and S. Simin, "Investigation of the Degree of Perceived Face Threat in Low, Medium, and High Face Threat Situations Regarding Politeness Theory in Iranian EFL Contexts", International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, Vol. 52, pp. 28-32, 2015
Online since:
May 2015
Export:
Distribution:
References:

[1] Berdine (1986) Why Some Students Fail to Participate in Class., Marketing News, Volume Twenty, Number Fifteen, 23-24. Brown, C.

[2] Fassinger, P. A. (1995). Understanding classroom interaction. The Journal of Higher Education, 66, 82-96.

[3] Fritschner, L. M. (2000). Inside the undergraduate college classroom: Faculty and students differ on the meaning of student participation. The Journal of Higher Education, 71, 342-362.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/00221546.2000.11780826

[4] Hyde, C. A., & Ruth, B.J. (2002). Multicultural content and class participation: Do students self-disclose? Journal of Social Work Education, 38, 241-256.

[5] Karp, D. A., & Yoels, W. C. (1976). The college classroom : some observations on the meanings of student participation. Sociology and Social Research, 60, 421-439.

[6] Kearney, P., Plax, T. G., Hays, E. R., & Ivey, M. J. (1991). College teacher misbehaviors: What students don't like about what teachers say and do. Communication Quarterly, 39, 309-324.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/01463379109369808

[7] Wade, R. (1994). Teacher education students'views on classroom discussion: Implications for fostering critical reflection . Teaching and teacher education, 10, 231-243.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/0742-051x(94)90015-9

[8] Phoenix, C. Y. (1987). Get them involved! Styles of high-and low-rated teachers. College Teaching, 35, 13-15.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1080/87567555.1987.10532352
Show More Hide
Cited By:
This article has no citations.