Paper Titles in Periodical
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences
Volume 51
Subscribe

Subscribe to our Newsletter and get informed about new publication regulary and special discounts for subscribers!

ILSHS > Volume 51 > An Experimental Analysis of Errors in Light of...
< Back to Volume

An Experimental Analysis of Errors in Light of Language Learning and Language Use and the Role of Executing Involvement to Increase Motivation in the English Language Classroom

Removed due to plagiarism

Full Text PDF

Abstract:

People are very likely to make mistakes during language learning, FL learners above all. We want in this paper to make an experimental effort to describe and pinpoint learners’ errors in language learning and language use hoping it will pave the ground for FL learners’ to have a better understanding of the errors they make. And yet all researches done empirically until present day show a correlation between students’ motivation and learning aftermaths in the teaching of English in ESL and EFL contexts. Notwithstanding of a sound theoretical framework, there are few studies which bring about strategies intended to increase motivation and report findings. This paper also endeavors to enlighten the factors which put students’ motivation in jeopardy and act as hindrance in efficient foreign language learning. It equips teachers with a tool for assessing students’ motivation so that they put into practice effective motivation strategies in the English classroom. The strategies and involvements suggested can be used by teachers in copious teaching situations after of course considering and taking their own teaching contexts under advisement.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (Volume 51)
Pages:
82-88
Citation:
M. Fatehi and O. Akbari, "An Experimental Analysis of Errors in Light of Language Learning and Language Use and the Role of Executing Involvement to Increase Motivation in the English Language Classroom", International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, Vol. 51, pp. 82-88, 2015
Online since:
May 2015
Export:
Distribution:
References:

[1] Alderman, M., K. (2004). Motivation for Achievement. Mahwah NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

[2] Ames, C. (1992). Classrooms: Goals, structures, and student motivation. Journal of Educational Psychology 84, 261-271.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037//0022-0663.84.3.261

[3] Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.5465/amr.1987.4306538

[4] Brophy, J. (2004). Motivating Students to Learn. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

[5] Byrne, D. (1988). Teaching Writing Skills. London: Longman.

[6] Covington, M. V. (1992). Making the Grade: a self-worth perspective on motivation and school reform. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/cbo9781139173582

[7] Covington, M. V. (1984). The motive for self worth. In R. Ames & C. Ames (Eds.), Research on motivation in education: Student motivation. San Diego, CA: Academic Press, p.77–113.

[8] Csikszentmihalyi, M. (1993). The evolving source: A psychology for the third millennium. New York: HarperCollins.

[9] Deci, E., L., & Moller, A., C. (2005). The concept of competence: A starting place for understanding intrinsic motivation and self-determined extrinsic motivation. In A. J. Elliot & C. S. Dweck (Eds.). Handbook of competence and motivation. New York: Guildford Press, pp.579-597.

[10] Dörnyei, Z. (2001). Motivational Strategies in the Language Classroom. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

[11] Gardner, R. C. (1988). The socio-educational model of second-language learning: Assumptions, findings, and issues. Language Learning 38, 101-126.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-1770.1988.tb00403.x

[12] Gardner, R. C. (1985). Social psychology and second language learning: The role of attitudes and motivation. London: Edward Arnold.

[13] Gardner, R., C. & MacIntyre P., D. (1993). A student's contributions to second-language learning. Part II: Affective variables. Language Teaching 26, 1-11.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/s0261444800000045

[14] Hedge, T. (2000). Teaching and learning in the language classroom. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[15] Lee I. (1997).ESL learners' performance in error correction in writing: some implications for teaching, System 25 (4), 465-477.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/s0346-251x(97)00045-6

[16] Lightbown, P. & and Spada, N. (1999). How Languages are Learned (2nd edition).Oxford: Oxford University Press.

[17] Maehr, M., & Meyer, H. (1997). Understanding motivation and schooling: Where we've been, where we are, and where we need to go. Educational Psychology Review 9, 371-409.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.7228/manchester/9781526105677.003.0005

[18] Patton, M. Q. (2002). Qualitative Research & Evaluation Methods (3rd ed.). United States of America: Sage.

[19] Schunk, D., H., Pintrich, P., R., and Meece, J., L. (2008). Motivation in Education: Theory, Research, and Applications (3rd ed.)., Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Merrill/Prentice Hall.

[20] Skehan, P. (1989). Individual Differences in Second Language Learning. London: Edward Arnold.

[21] Thrash, T., and Elliot, A. (2001). Delimiting and integrating achievement motive and goal constructs. In A. Efklides, J. Kuhl, and R. Sorrentino, (Eds.), Trends and prospects in motivation research. Boston: Kluwer, pp.3-21.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-47676-2_1

[22] Weiner, B. (1985). An attributional theory of achievement motivation and emotion. Psychological Review 92 (4), 548-73.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1037//0033-295x.92.4.548

[23] Weiner, B. (1986). An attributional theory of motivation and emotion. New York: Springer-Verlag.

[24] Wigfield, A., & Eccles, J., S. (2000). Expectancy-value theory of achievement motivation. Contemporary Educational Psychology 25, 68-81.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1006/ceps.1999.1015

[25] Burt, M. and Kiparsky, C. (1972). The Gooficon: A Repair Manual for English. Newbury House, Rowley, MA.

[26] Carney, E. (1994). A Survey of English Spelling. Routledge, London.

[27] Chomsky, N. (1980). Rules and Representations. Blackwell, Oxford.

[28] Corder, S.P. (1981). Error Analysis and Interlanguage. Oxford University Press, Oxford.

[29] Dulay, H., Burt, M. and Krashen, S.D. (1982). Language Two. Newbury House, Rowley, MA.

[30] Gatbonton, E. (1983). Patterned phonetic variability in second language speech: a gradual diffusion model, in B.W. Robinett and J. Schachter (eds), Second Language Learning: Contrastive Analysis, Error Analysis and Related Aspects. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI. pp.240-55.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/s0272263100005490

[31] James, Carl. (1990). Learner language, Language Teaching Vol. 23 No. 4: 205-13.

[32] James, Carl and Garrett, P. (eds) (1991). Language Awareness in the Classroom. Longman, London.

[33] Stenson, N. (1983). Induced errors, in B.W. Robinett and J. Schachter (eds), Second Language Learning: Contrastive Analysis, Error Analysis and Related Aspects. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, MI. pp.256-71.

DOI: https://doi.org/10.1017/s0272263100005490

[34] Thomas, J. (1983). Cross-cultural pragmatic failure, Applied Linguistics Vol. 4 No. 2: 91-112. ( Received 22 April 2015; accepted 06 May 2015 ).

Show More Hide
Cited By:
This article has no citations.