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Implication of Freedom and Change in Nigeria’s Women Education Programme: Is Autonomy Necessary?

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Abstract:

The clamour for equal treatment and opportunity has made women desirous in their struggle to break the shackles of cultural imperative, which they believe have enslaved them. Social indicators reveal that women deserve equal opportunity with their male counterparts. The trend of women education and the current of socialization among social crusaders, gender practitioners and women showed freedom as both a cherished goal and threat to the girl-child. Can freedom therefore be something essential in women education and socialization? Put differently, can the nourishing of the tendency towards autonomous activities in a “proper” social environment not bring about the inherent freedom and the noblest image of the girl-child? In an attempt to provide answers to this questions and other issues, the a priori-deductive method of analysis was employed in examining autonomy, human aspect of freedom, women education, and socialization. It was emphasized that to enjoy freedom without some degree of autonomy is gross abuse of freedom. The inherent freedom is realizable only if women education is refocused towards encouraging independence, self-knowledge, and rational choice.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences (Volume 24)
Pages:
64-70
Citation:
B. E. Momodu "Implication of Freedom and Change in Nigeria’s Women Education Programme: Is Autonomy Necessary?", International Letters of Social and Humanistic Sciences, Vol. 24, pp. 64-70, 2014
Online since:
Mar 2014
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References:

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