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Heavy Metals Accumulation in Surface Waters, Bottom Sediments and Aquatic Organisms in Lake Mainit, Philippines

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Abstract:

Lake Mainit is one of the largest lakes recognized as Key Biodiversity Areas (KBA) in the Philippines with rich fishery resources. However, the lake is at risk from heavy metal contamination due to inputs of industrial, agricultural effluents and small-scale mining activities. The present work evaluated levels of heavy metals namely cadmium, lead, and mercury from key aquatic fauna and sediments from seven strategic sections of the lake in 2018. Muscle samples of all seven fish species assessed were below detections limits (BDL) for tHg and Cd. Trace concentrations of Pb in the muscles were detected in Oreochromis niloticus, Glossogobius giuris, Channa striata and Vivipara angularis but values were within safe ranges. Trace concentrations of Pb in the riverine crab (Sundathelpusa sp) exceeded safe limits. Both Cd and tHg were below detection limits in the three invertebrates assessed. Traces of Pb were detected in S4 (Magtiaco) and S5 (Jaliobong) below standard limits (0.05 ppm) only during the southwest (SW) monsoon but Pb were not detected across all stations during the NE monsoon of 2018. For Cd, however, trace concentrations were detected only during the NE monsoon wherein Cd in S2 (Mayag), S3 (Magpayang), S4 (Magtiaco), S5 (Jaliobong), S6 (Dinarawan) and S7 (Kalinawan) exceeded standard limits for Cd in waters (0.01 ppm). Concentrations of tHg in the water were not detected across the two sampling seasons in all seven tributary stations. In sediments, Pb were all detected during the southwest monsoon with highest Pb concentrations in S6 (Dinarawan) and S7 (Kalinawan) which exceeded safe limits. Trace Cd in sediments were mostly below detectable limits. Concentrations of tHg in sediments exceeded safe limits during the SE monsoon in S4 (Magtiaco) and S7 (Kalinawan) areas. These findings recommended that continuous heavy metal monitoring must be conducted. It is also strongly suggested to evaluate the presence of heavy metals in other aquatic organisms and assess the ecological risk posed by these heavy metals though heavy metal speciation analysis.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Natural Sciences (Volume 79)
Pages:
40-49
Citation:
E. L. Ebol et al., "Heavy Metals Accumulation in Surface Waters, Bottom Sediments and Aquatic Organisms in Lake Mainit, Philippines", International Letters of Natural Sciences, Vol. 79, pp. 40-49, 2020
Online since:
July 2020
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