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Involvement of Phenolics, Flavonoids, and Phenolic Acids in High Yield Characteristics of Rice (Oryza Sativa L.)

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Abstract:

The present study examined the correlation between phenolic acids and flavonoids with high rice yield traits of rice. It was observed that the difference of phenolic contents among the tested rice lines occurred only in the vegetative stage. The concentrations of phenolic acids were higher in the rice high yield cultivars than low yield variety in the vegetative stage, but they either decreased dramatically or disappeared during the development stage. Caffeic acid was found only in high yield rice, whereas chlorogenic acid was detected only in low yield rice. Sinapic acid was the dominant phenolic acid in high yield cultivars at vegetative stage (3.7 mg/g), followed by ferulic acid (1.2 mg/g). These findings suggest that caffeic acid, ferulic acid, sinapic acid and chlorogenic acid may play a particular role in forming yield components in rice. The cultivar B3 contained high amount of sinapic acid may be used as a natural source for pharmaceutical use.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Natural Sciences (Volume 68)
Pages:
19-26
Citation:
T. D. Xuan et al., "Involvement of Phenolics, Flavonoids, and Phenolic Acids in High Yield Characteristics of Rice (Oryza Sativa L.)", International Letters of Natural Sciences, Vol. 68, pp. 19-26, 2018
Online since:
April 2018
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[1] T. Xuan, T. Anh, H. Tran, T. Khanh, T. Dat, "Mutation Breeding of a N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU)-Induced Rice (Oryza sativa L. ssp. Indica) Population for the Yield Attributing Traits", Sustainability, Vol. 11, p. 1062, 2019

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/su11041062

[2] T. Viet, T. Xuan, T. Van, Y. Andriana, R. Rayee, H. Tran, "Comprehensive Fractionation of Antioxidants and GC-MS and ESI-MS Fingerprints of Celastrus hindsii Leaves", Medicines, Vol. 6, p. 64, 2019

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/medicines6020064

[3] K. Kakar, T. Xuan, N. Quan, I. Wafa, H. Tran, T. Khanh, T. Dat, "Efficacy of N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) Mutation on Enhancing the Yield and Quality of Rice", Agriculture, Vol. 9, p. 212, 2019

DOI: https://doi.org/10.3390/agriculture9100212