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Impact of Low-Molecule Acidic Peptides on Growth and Histological Structure of Inner Organs of Marbled Crayfish Procambarus fallax (Hagen, 1870) F. virginalis

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Abstract:

The results of studies on the effects of low molecular weight acidic solution peptides on the growth and development of the marbled crayfish artificial cultivation.An increasing weights of juvenile freshwater crayfish under the influence of dietary supplement "Albuvir" drug. With the use of histological methods of research, found the impact of 0.01% solution of the drug on the state of the marbled crayfish lobules of hepatopancreas and fat cells. Developed a method for growing juvenile freshwater crayfish with "Albuvir", which allows to increase the weight gain of crustaceans on 24.3–27.2% and reduce the level of cannibalism at 20%.

Info:

Periodical:
International Letters of Natural Sciences (Volume 56)
Pages:
1-6
Citation:
O. Marenkov et al., "Impact of Low-Molecule Acidic Peptides on Growth and Histological Structure of Inner Organs of Marbled Crayfish Procambarus fallax (Hagen, 1870) F. virginalis", International Letters of Natural Sciences, Vol. 56, pp. 1-6, 2016
Online since:
July 2016
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References:

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